DECEMBER - ISLAND CREEK OYSTERS

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  • More nights on Ursela’s ‘Hunts’ lease

  • Farmer-athletes

  • More days on Joe’s ‘Saquish’ lease

  • A visit to Clark’s Island

  • Changing skyline at the dock

  • Holiday Hustle / ACDC


more nights on URSULA’S hunts lease

A shout-out to Emmy Hagen of ICO’s media group for her photo’s!

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As the evening tide goes out we pull empty trays to stack on the barge for transport to the property for winter storage. We pick, cull and in the dark, Ursula will motor full orange bins across the bay to the Oysterplex for counting and bagging tomorrow. Through all of it, she is on-point, doing what she loves to do best.
— oatbay
@instagram.com/emmyhagen

@instagram.com/emmyhagen

@instagram.com/emmyhagen

@instagram.com/emmyhagen

@instagram.com/emmyhagen

@instagram.com/emmyhagen

Almost the whole gang was out on this particular night. From the Hatchery was Hannah, Shawna, Emily, Cat, and Nick; from the Farm was Skip, Ursula, Cory, Tim, and me. Joe worked all day but had to head to BU for his MBA class. Emily Hagen was behind the camera.

@instagram.com/emmyhagen

@instagram.com/emmyhagen

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By the end of December, over 2,000 trays like these will have been moved onto the property for winter storage.

@instagram.com/emmyhagen

@instagram.com/emmyhagen

@instagram.com/emmyhagen

@instagram.com/emmyhagen

@instagram.com/emmyhagen

@instagram.com/emmyhagen

When the sun goes down, we’re surrounded by sights and sounds that few get to enjoy. Yes .. temperatures can be in the teen’s and twenty’s. Our chilly bodies and cold, wet fingers aren’t exactly what I would call fun and are hard to ignore. But that doesn’t matter to Island Creek oyster farmers; nights like these are rich to the senses. When we get back to our warm gear shed, there is a heightened feeling of accomplishment and pride.
— oatbay

… picking at night:

@instagram.com/emmyhagen

@instagram.com/emmyhagen

@instagram.com/emmyhagen

@instagram.com/emmyhagen

… and culling in the morning:

Everyone’s a bit quiet and sleepy, a by-product of the night before.

Everyone’s a bit quiet and sleepy, a by-product of the night before.


fARMER-ATHLETES

Below is an average December work week from an exercise (and weather) standpoint, so-says my Fitbit - which I’m thinking represents a general benchmark-week for Island Creek farmers (fellow farmers are half my age and twice as strong, so my guess is that their step/cardio benefits are a lot higher).

#keeponshuckin’

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more days on joe’s saqiush lease

If there is such a category as “The Most Pleasant Place To Farm Oysters In Single Digit Temperatures”, the Saquish farm wins. The stark beauty from Skip’s cottage on over to Clark’s Island is something else ...
— oatbay
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A view of the commute to Saquish from “The Ford”:

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A view of the commute to Saquish from “The Carolina”:

Cat, preparing to bag some Aunt Dotties:

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Oyster farming in winter temperatures and winds isn’t exactly easy, and what surrounds us is breathtaking. A double positive :)
— oatbay

a visit to clark’s Island

Duxbury Rural Historical Society, ca. 1775

Duxbury Rural Historical Society, ca. 1775

CLARKS ISLAND

The Duxbury Rural Historical Society owns approximately 17 acres of land on Clark’s Island, located in Plymouth Bay. These holdings include land on the west shore, the eastern shore, Pulpit Rock, a boat house called Hop House, and the house property known as Cedarfield (built in 1836 and the second-oldest house on the island). The property was donated to the DRHS in 1969 by the Pilgrim Rock Foundation. The property had been part of the estate of Sarah Wingate Taylor (d. 1964). Sarah’s summers, since infancy, were spent at her ancestral home on Clark’s Island in Plymouth Bay. During her time, eight of the Island’s ten houses were still owned by her relations, the Watson and Taylor families. Her most precious possession was Cedarfield, the second oldest house on the Island and nearby Election Rock where the Pilgrim explorers spent their first Sabbath. There she directed the Pilgrim Rock School for American Studies beginning in 1963, inviting talented students and scholars to engage in discussion and advanced learning. Notable visitors to the island throughout the history of the house, include Henry David Thoreau, Louisa May Alcott, and Truman Capote.

Each year in July/August, the DRHS invites the public to join us at Cedarfield for a picnic, followed by a gathering at Pulpit Rock for a historical perspective on the wonderful island. Pulpit Rock has sometimes been called “the real Plymouth Rock” and was the location at which the passengers of the Mayflower held their first service in the New World, before venturing further into the harbor.
— Duxbury Rural Historical Society
Skip Taylor’s father, Bill Taylor, was a boatbuilder who owned Long Point Marine. The largest boat he built (and the largest sailboat built in Duxbury in the 20th century) was the 50-foot schooner Mya. It was designed by Duxbury’s own Ray Hunt and was in Duxbury harbor when I was young. Ownership moved around but the Kennedy family in Hyannisport has had her for the past few decades.
— David Corey

A short skiff ride to the Taylor property

The arrow points toward the     Taylor farm, which is where Joe, Nick, Tim, and I pulled and stacked the  grows  (floating trays) after thousands of baby Aunt Dotties were moved to the root cellar on Washington Street for a winters nap.

The arrow points toward the Taylor farm, which is where Joe, Nick, Tim, and I pulled and stacked the grows (floating trays) after thousands of baby Aunt Dotties were moved to the root cellar on Washington Street for a winters nap.

Duxbury Rural Historical Society, ca. 1903

Duxbury Rural Historical Society, ca. 1903

Walk in the Wood

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Taylor Homestead

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Pulpit Rock

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ON THE SABBOTH DAY
WEE RESTED
20 DECEMBER
1620
— Pulpit Rock

CHANGING SKYLINE at the dock

Out of harms way for the winter

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Mark with Cory wrote, choreographed and implemented the final removal from the bay of at least twelve more platforms and houses - in just one day. It was a pretty awesome undertaking …

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holiday hustle

Thousands of holiday orders: How do Island Creek Oysters get from here to there?

Cooperation, and timing!

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Come and ride with Joe, Nick and me on a 90 second commute from Duxbury’s town landing -delivering oysters to Island Creek’s new operation/distribution center:

- ACDC -

#icooperationsrocks!

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It was coordinated mayhem around campus during the week prior to the holidays. On December 17 alone, Ursula and we farmers delivered about  1,200 fifty-count bags and 1,200 twelve-count bags *  to Operations for holiday shipments to places like the one above.  *  translates to around 74,000 oysters that were counted, bagged and zip-tied by farmers, then tagged, boxed and staged for delivery by Operations.

It was coordinated mayhem around campus during the week prior to the holidays. On December 17 alone, Ursula and we farmers delivered about 1,200 fifty-count bags and 1,200 twelve-count bags * to Operations for holiday shipments to places like the one above.

* translates to around 74,000 oysters that were counted, bagged and zip-tied by farmers, then tagged, boxed and staged for delivery by Operations.


december 31

So long, 2018

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