OCTOBER - ISLAND CREEK OYSTER FARM

The chill is closing in and all is well …

Welcome, Cat!

.. to the hatchery and farm ..

110318 cat2.jpg
110318 cat3.jpg
110318 cat.jpg

Scenes and Sounds

100418 seagulls.jpg
1006128 heron2.jpg

The Lunar Tide

100818 new moon.jpg
100818 new moon tide.jpg
102118 white caps.jpg
101019 mud.jpg

Time to go to work

102418 k1.jpg
102418 k3.jpg
102418 k2.jpg

No one said it would be easy

101018 hands3.jpg
101018 hands1.jpg
101018 hands2.jpg

From the Hatchery to the Back River Nursery

Sorting, bagging, un-bagging, lifting, hauling, dragging, getting dirty - enjoying every minute, wind, rain and shine. From the Hatchery to the Back River Nursery is where so much begins to come together, as millions of baby oysters (spat) grow big enough to move out to the Saquish and Hunts flats in Duxbury Bay.

The trip from the hatchery to the Back River Nursery.

The trip from the hatchery to the Back River Nursery.

The trip from the nursery to the farm, about 6 weeks later.

The trip from the nursery to the farm, about 6 weeks later.

hatchery to table.png

Oysters are filter-feeders, feeding on phytoplankton and other nutrients from the ocean water. From the hatchery, adult female and male oysters are put into breeding trays where they spawn. Several hours later, the fertilized eggs hatch the larva. By the time they’re about 6 weeks old, they’re ready to leave the hatchery and moved to the upwellers. In a month-or-so, the baby oysters (spat) will be big enough to move from the upwellers to the Back River Nursery where they continue to grow. After about six weeks, they’ll be ready to be moved into the bay.

What is an upweller?

110418 upweller.jpg
110418 upweller2.jpg
An upweller is a system of tanks that flow seawater over the oyster spat so that it receives a good flow of nutritious water for it to filter and feed on. The oysters filter out the plankton, digest it and use the nutrition to grow. A typical upweller contains the oyster spat in containers with screen bottoms. The water is forced up through the screen bottoms around the oysters and out the top where it is returned to the ocean or estuary.
— massoyster.org

miscellaneous photos from the dock

Joe: the man, the myth, the legend, the River Boss.

Joe: the man, the myth, the legend, the River Boss.

Me.  #emfay  photo

Me. #emfay photo

Nick: always getting it done until it’s done.

Nick: always getting it done until it’s done.

Bags pulled from the nursery waiting to be off-loaded and graded.

Bags pulled from the nursery waiting to be off-loaded and graded.

Re-bagging the seed after grading, for their trip to the bay.

Re-bagging the seed after grading, for their trip to the bay.

Grading baby oysters: meet Bubba

Bubba is the large grader, and is used to grade Row 34’s.

Bubba is the large grader, and is used to grade Row 34’s.

This is a smaller grader, and used to grade the Island Creeks and Aunt Dotties.

This is a smaller grader, and used to grade the Island Creeks and Aunt Dotties.

100418 grader1.jpg
100218 grader tunnel.jpg
100418 grader2.jpg
102118 bubble.jpg
101718 stack2.jpg
101718 stack1.jpg
101718 skiff to br.jpg

A trip to the back river nursery

101518 br1.jpg
101518 br2.jpg

The summer sun is fading as the year grows old ...
— Moody Blues

Breaking it all down for the fall and winter

BEFORE

BEFORE

DURING

DURING

102518 float2.jpg
102518 float3.jpg
AFTER

AFTER

102818 crane7.jpg
102818 crane9.jpg
103018 upweller1.jpg
103018 upweller2.jpg
102818 crane1.jpg
102818 crane2.jpg
102818 crane3.jpg
102818 crane10.jpg
102818 crane10.jpg
102818 crane12.jpg
102818 plex2.jpg
102818 plex3.jpg

This season’s first nor’ easter

It was relatively puny, and with most of the gear contained it couldn’t have come at a better time. Cleanup was minimal.

102718 w2.jpg
192718 w1.jpg
102718 w3.jpg
110418 wind scale.jpg
102718 w4.jpg
110418 wind scale.jpg

Saquish: 31 October, 2018

103118 squish1.jpg
103118 squish2.jpg

island creek’s 2018 fishing tournament

October 6

Hi All-

I hope everyone is excited for the fishing tournament tomorrow! The weather forecast is looking great. A few rules to go over before you get out on the water:
1. Meet at the dock at 11:30am, lines in the water at noon
2. VHF channel 87
3. Chris will be picking up sandwiches to take on the boats
4. The competition is individual although people will be paired or grouped onto the boats
5. Take a photo of each fish with the provided tape measure, except for quantity of catch- just keep a total count. A catch = hook out! Use the graphic below for measurement guidelines.
6. If you have extra gear, rods, tackle, etc., please bring it to spread around for those that might need to borrow.
7. Any striper that is over 28” save and bring in to cook.
8. Be back on the dock by 4pm, ready to compare catch!
9. The prizes are for individuals, not teams.
Smallest fish
Biggest fish
Quantity of catch
Diversity of catch
Tautog or Sea Robin
10. Have fun and be safe! The party starts at 5pm on the raw bar patio. If you don’t win a trophy you can always try for a raffle prize!
~Tay
— Taylor Plimton, October 5

The teams:

  • Chris Sherman, Sean Telo, Miche Wong

  • Skip, Ben Caliendo

  • Mark Boutlillier (won biggest fish), Colby Connell, Anna Priester

  • Bob Mills, Dave Schneller, Matt D’Amore (won smallest fish)

  • Tommy Reale (won quantity of catch - 18 stripers!), Jon Gomer, Joe Gauthier

No one caught Tautog or Sea Robin, so no awards given …

We all had a great time, and the weather was perfect!

My team:

Dave

Dave

A slightly younger me

A slightly younger me

Matt

Matt

Our team fished from noon until 4:00, and this is where we fished. The blue asterisk is the ICO dock, our team’s beginning and ending point. Matt landed the only 2 stripers on our boat, and we all caught a picture-perfect day!

Our team fished from noon until 4:00, and this is where we fished. The blue asterisk is the ICO dock, our team’s beginning and ending point. Matt landed the only 2 stripers on our boat, and we all caught a picture-perfect day!

Gurnet (from the ocean-side), near the spot where Matt caught striper #1.

Gurnet (from the ocean-side), near the spot where Matt caught striper #1.

Clark’s Island (from the north-side), near the spot where Matt caught striper #2.

Clark’s Island (from the north-side), near the spot where Matt caught striper #2.

Matt, and the smallest striper.

Matt, and the smallest striper.

Chris, Michelle, and Sean, who’ll tell you a tale of the one that got away.

Chris, Michelle, and Sean, who’ll tell you a tale of the one that got away.

Mark, and the biggest striper.

Mark, and the biggest striper.

Mark and the winning striper. Instead of fishing all afternoon he, Anna, and Colby steamed down to Plymouth for an afternoon of bar-hopping. On their way back from getting hammered, Mark thought he’d drop his line in the water just so he could say he actually fished, and BOOM!!

Mark, Anna and Colby’s fishing ground.

Mark, Anna and Colby’s fishing ground.


The cat in the hats

102918 let it be2.jpg

So long, October!

#hannahpearson15 #seanmaioranophotography  photo

#hannahpearson15 #seanmaioranophotography photo

so long, october!

120218 logo.jpg
120218 logo.jpg
120218 logo.jpg
120218 logo.jpg